Vegan Macaroni & Cheese

 

I have a confession to make.

Vegan cooking scares me.

Well, maybe I should say that it intimidates me. Yes, that sounds better. Less cowardly. I’m not sure exactly what it is (the blenders, long lists of unusual ingredients, food processors, raw cashews…), but something about a gourmet vegan recipe fills me with childlike terror.

Then, miracle of miracles, I saw the following recipe on Oh She Glows and to be honest, it couldn’t have come at a more opportune time. Not only had I been craving mac n’ cheese for DAYS (and couldn’t stop talking about it – sorry Sean), but I also had a butternut squash sitting in my produce bowl, lonely and desperate to feel useful in life.

So in an uncharacteristically brave move, I put on my big-girl pants, shooed the cat off the counter and dove right in.

Below are the ingredients as recommended by Angela on her lovely website, Oh She Glows:

  • 1/2 Butternut squash (peeled & chopped)
  • 3/4 cup raw cashews
  • 1 cup of non-dairy milk (and as needed for getting your desired consistency)
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 tbsp of fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp kosher salt (or as needed)
  • 6-7 tbsp nooch (nutritional yeast)
  • 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tsp or more Italian seasonings
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp Turmeric (optional)
  • Pepper to taste
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp Paprika (or as needed)
  • Pasta of choice

I made a few small tweaks to the above list, based on my personal preferences and what I had available in my pantry. I used unsweetened almond milk rather than soy milk, and I must say that I was really thrilled with the end result consistency-wise. I also skipped the pepper, used Spike rather than Italian seasoning and added quite a bit of turmeric.

* Side Note: The active ingredient in turmeric is curcumin (this is what gives turmeric its bright hue) and this highly beneficial spice has been shown to be a natural anti-inflamatory, a good source of antioxidants and has been found useful in the treatment of a host of diseases and ailments, including Alzheimer’s, arthritis, cancer, colds, the flu and diabetes. I really enjoy cooking with turmeric and include it whenever possible, so if you haven’t given this beautiful spice a chance I highly suggest that you do!

I added a little bite to the dish with ground chili pepper and cayenne powder, and finally, in order to make this delicious dish gluten-free as well as vegan, I used brown rice pasta in lieu of whole wheat.

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350F and line a baking sheet.  In a bowl, season chopped squash with some oil (I used coconut) and kosher salt, lay on baking sheet and roast in oven for 40 minutes, flipping after 20 minutes.

2. Assemble the ingredients for the cheese sauce (cashews, non-dairy milk, garlic, lemon, salt, nutritional yeast, pepper, mustard, seasonings). Add the cashews to food processor & blend until fine. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth (I added the almond milk slowly throughout the blending process). Leave the sauce in the processor as you will be adding the squash.

3. Cook your pasta according to package directions.

4. After 40 minutes of roasting add the squash to the food processor and blend until smooth. Adjust spices to taste and add additional almond milk to get desired thickness.

5. Drain and rinse pasta with cold water and mix pasta with cheese sauce.

 

The sauce is gooey, cheese-y and has a great consistency, thickening as it cools. As someone who lives alone and frequently cooks for one, my leftovers are very important to me, and I must say this tasted even better the next day!

If vegan cooking intimidates you as well or if the idea of vegan “cheese” is off-putting, I highly recommend giving this recipe a try and expanding your culinary horizons as I did.

I found that this was something of a therapy session for me and I can genuinely say that I’m less daunted by vegan cooking than I was a week ago. So hopefully this will be just the first of many recipes that I’ll be trying out and sharing with you.

Bon Appétit!

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Community Sponsored Agriculture – CSA

Today I would like to discuss a topic with you that is very close to my heart – And my refrigerator – Community Sponsored Agriculture (CSAs).

If you’re anything like me, you enjoy having a variety of fruits and vegetables in your fridge at any given time so that you can make quick and healthy meals. Trips to Whole Foods and other specialty shops can be hard on the pocketbook, especially if you need to restock your cupboards with multiple trips a week.

Enter the CSA…

CSAs are programs that provide you with direct access to food produced by local farmers. Fresh, seasonal, high quality food. Essentially it’s a mini farmer’s market delivered directly to your front door, or a nearby pick-up location, for a fraction of the price that you’d pay at a large chain grocery store.

Why did I choose to join a CSA?

First, I was intrigued by the idea of giving my money to local farmers directly without a big corporation acting as the middle man. Second, I live car-free in San Francisco and rely on my own two feet for most of my errands. Finding a CSA with a drop-off three blocks away saves me time, energy and effort, all good things when you don’t want to run to the grocery store after spending all day at the office. Third, I was interested in learning to eat a more seasonal diet. True, I virtually always crave spinach and sweet potatoes, but I began to wonder if I was missing out when I purchased the same things each week. I quickly learned that I’d been missing out on a lot.

What is the biggest benefit of joining a CSA?

You don’t get to pick and choose what you receive through these programs, you are given a box/basket/bag containing a variety of produce that was picked at the farm that week. The result is that you’ll frequently get the opportunity to try things you wouldn’t normally buy for yourself. You get to plan your meals around what’s in season and what the farmers in/near your city are harvesting, rather than what’s being flow in from out-of-state or South America. In addition to getting the chance to eat seasonal, local produce and support smaller farmers, you’re reducing the pollution created when foods are transported long distances.

How expensive are CSAs?

They’re not! Without packaging and the shipping costs to send the food around the country, all you’re paying for are the fruits and vegetables themselves. Each CSA is going to charge slightly different fees and the cost will depend on how often you receive deliveries and whether you request any special additions to your basket. That being said, most of the programs that I researched when I was making my choice were less than $30 per delivery. I don’t know about you, but I can do quite a bit more damage than that given half an hour at Whole Foods!

Did anything surprise you when you first signed up?

If you’re used to the beautiful displays and waxed fruit at grocery stores, your deliveries may initially come as a shock to you. When I say that everything is harvested that week, I’m not exaggerating. The food will be unwashed, with dirt and leaves still clinging to it. Recycled and reusable containers will be utilized whenever possible, so there wont be pristine packaging and sterile plastic wrappings. A good word to keep in mind when you prepare yourself for your first delivery is rustic. It is coming straight from the field to you, with no stops for beautification.

What’s an example of the contents of a shipment?

My most recent delivery contained the following: a bag full of small navel oranges, a large grapefruit, a big bag of spinach, a large bag of pre-mixed stir fry greens, a head of lettuce, onions & garlic, a head of green cabbage, collard greens (yum!), half a dozen small apples and a large bunch of carrots. The variety and types of produce you receive will vary depending on the region you’re in, the season and the CSA you choose.

There are a variety of CSAs currently available and with a little research you can determine the one that suits your needs best. You’ll find that there are some farms that offer you additional supplements to the standard fruit & vegetable boxes, like eggs, milk, cheeses and meats. There are both certified organic farms and traditional farms offering CSAs and you can get deliveries weekly, twice a month, monthly… Whatever will work best for you.

If you’re interested, Google CSAs in your area to try to find one that is perfect for you, or check out the LocalHarvet website to help you narrow down the choices available to you.

The Bay Area has some amazing options and I will admit that it was a hard decision to pick which CSA I wanted to support. I finally made my choice based on the following criteria that were important to me: (1) certified organic, (2) close-by to cut down on shipping cost and pollution from transportation, and (3) a pick-up location walking distance from my apartment. In the end, I went with Eatwell Farm. I had previously seen them at the Ferry Building’s Saturday morning farmer’s market and was impressed by their selection of beautiful produce. I’ve been a proud member since October 2009 and they’ve been very easy to deal with and consistently produce excellent fruits and vegetables.

I hope that you’ve enjoyed this post and that if you haven’t looked into signing up for a CSA prior to this that you’ll consider it now and keep in mind the benefits to the environment, local farmers and your refrigerator!

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